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Leadership is Often Seeing Opportunity in Crisis

In the fall of 1793 Philadelphia was in the throes of a Yellow Fever epidemic that ultimately killed 5,000 residents. Richard Allen, minister, educator, and founder of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church, saw in the crisis an opportunity to preserve the infected city and transcend racial stereotypes. He and members of his church wandered the city, entering boarded up homes of white people where neighbors would not venture. They tended the sick, buried the dead, and burned infected furnishings. In the face of city-wide paralysis, these Black Christians risked their lives in Christian kindness. Following the epidemic, Allen defended the actions of his black congregants against scurrilous charges, and used the occasion of black mercy toward whites to advocate for abolition and equal rights. His actions through the epidemic and after point to leadership that is creative and spontaneous, writes Richard Newman, associate professor of history at Rochester Institute of Technology.

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Inspiration from the Liturgical Letter for 26th Sunday after Pentecost

Confidence in Our Creator"Lord, we take refuge in you (Psalm 16), for you listen to our despair (1 Samuel 1:4-20) and...

Practicing Gratitude

My wife and I recently relocated, which led us to visit a half-dozen churches in the past two months. Each seemed to...

2019 BAA Trailblazer of the Year named by Union Presbyterian Seminary

The Black Alumni Association (BAA) of Union Presbyterian Seminary is pleased to announce and to recognize the Rev. Dr....

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Review rank-ordered data on religion in the U.S. and around the world. Includes the latest data from the Religious Congregations & Membership Study, 2010

 

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