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The Korean-American generation gap

Although just 2 percent of the people of Asia practice Christianity, more than half of the people of South Korea are Christian. South Korean immigrants to the United States typically settle in ethnic churches with Korean pastors and worship services, which become de facto enclaves separated from U.S. society. Second-generation Koreans, participating more fully in American society, leave their parents’ churches at rates as high as 90 percent. A new generation of Korean-heritage clergy is attempting to stem the exodus. In an article written for the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship, a program devoted to renewing worship in Christian faith communities, Joan Huyser-Honig explores the historical and cultural roots of Korean Christianity and the spiritual and cultural needs of modern Christian Koreans in the U.S. Discussion questions focus on key points of the article that are relevant to all congregations struggling to keep young adults engaged in their faith lives.

Korean American Churches Asian American Young people Faith Lilly Foundation Funding Grants Insights into Religion News

 

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