Jump to Navigation

Resources

The Korean-American generation gap

Although just 2 percent of the people of Asia practice Christianity, more than half of the people of South Korea are Christian. South Korean immigrants to the United States typically settle in ethnic churches with Korean pastors and worship services, which become de facto enclaves separated from U.S. society. Second-generation Koreans, participating more fully in American society, leave their parents’ churches at rates as high as 90 percent. A new generation of Korean-heritage clergy is attempting to stem the exodus. In an article written for the Calvin Institute of Christian Worship, a program devoted to renewing worship in Christian faith communities, Joan Huyser-Honig explores the historical and cultural roots of Korean Christianity and the spiritual and cultural needs of modern Christian Koreans in the U.S. Discussion questions focus on key points of the article that are relevant to all congregations struggling to keep young adults engaged in their faith lives.

 

News

News

Faith and Work

Industry leaders, CEOs, and trustees from the Fuller community reflect on evolving opportunities at the intersection of...

Is America a Christian Nation? Should it Be?

“Christianity, or any branch of it, loses its Christian character when its self-proclaimed supporters outnumber and...

Reflective Leadership Grants Offer Christian Leaders "Balcony Time"

"Balcony time" is to reflect on accomplishments, broaden perspectives and discern next steps. Clergy or lay leaders...

Calendar

Mon, Jul 9, 2018 - 09:00 am
Race is a reality that profoundly affects congregational life throughout the United States, and there is a growing desire among...

Search