Jump to Navigation

Reverse Graffit Frieze of Roman History

"In the spring of 2016, the South African artist William Kentridge created a frieze of Roman history on a portion of the embankment wall that runs along the Tiber. Containing some eighty images, many of them more than thirty feet tall, the frieze stretches for a third of a mile along the river. Kentridge created it through a process called “reverse graffiti”—he placed enormous stencils against the wall and then power-washed around them so that when the stencils were removed, the remaining images were made from the patina of grime and organic matter that had accumulated on the wall over the years." [Read more].

William Kentridge Reverse Graffiti Roman History Insights into Religion Lilly Foundation Grants

 

News

News

Faith and Work

Industry leaders, CEOs, and trustees from the Fuller community reflect on evolving opportunities at the intersection of...

Is America a Christian Nation? Should it Be?

“Christianity, or any branch of it, loses its Christian character when its self-proclaimed supporters outnumber and...

Reflective Leadership Grants Offer Christian Leaders "Balcony Time"

"Balcony time" is to reflect on accomplishments, broaden perspectives and discern next steps. Clergy or lay leaders...

Calendar

Mon, Jul 9, 2018 - 09:00 am
Race is a reality that profoundly affects congregational life throughout the United States, and there is a growing desire among...

Popular Tools

Search