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Reverse Graffit Frieze of Roman History

"In the spring of 2016, the South African artist William Kentridge created a frieze of Roman history on a portion of the embankment wall that runs along the Tiber. Containing some eighty images, many of them more than thirty feet tall, the frieze stretches for a third of a mile along the river. Kentridge created it through a process called “reverse graffiti”—he placed enormous stencils against the wall and then power-washed around them so that when the stencils were removed, the remaining images were made from the patina of grime and organic matter that had accumulated on the wall over the years." [Read more].

William Kentridge Reverse Graffiti Roman History Insights into Religion Lilly Foundation Grants

 

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Thu, Sep 27, 2018 - 09:00 am
The dates for Homecoming 2018 have been set for Sept.

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